Maui prison

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When I was in Hawaii recently I visited the Hale Pa’ahao prison on Maui. It was quite different from Alcatraz.  Much more relaxed.  It’s on the West Maui town of Lahaina, down a side street off the main drag where all the tourist shops are. It was interesting to see such a quaint, pleasant building — and of course they have a big palm tree out in front.  The outer walls are made of coral.

With all the whaling going on there in the 1850s, apparently they needed a place to lock up the rowdy sailors who had too much to drink.  But conditions weren’t very harsh at all, and the offenses for which you could get locked up for were relatively minor.  About the worst thing you could get in trouble for was “disturbing the quiet of the night” or “lascivious conduct.”

The prison rules were relatively mild as well. But check out Rule No. 14 … now THAT one sounds interesting!

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Tying the knot

Do you like to tie knots? I sure do! But you know that.

I am not only interested in the literal kind of knots involving rope, but also the figurative kind. That’s right, I’m talking marriage. Tying the knot. Entering into wedlock. The old ball and chain. Conjugal bonds. You get the idea.

 

 

 

This week I attended the wedding of my good friends Alan and Dave. They happen to live in one of the few states where same-sex couples are able to marry.

Unfortunately, most gays and lesbians in this country are not allowed to marry under the laws of the states in which they happen to reside. Even worse, federal legislation enacted by the U.S Congress and signed into law by President Bill Clinton in 1996 bars any federal recognition of same-sex marriage and prevents any of the legal rights afforded to opposite-sex married couples from being granted to same-sex partners.

That means same-sex couples in long-term, committed relationships have to have to jump through all sorts of legal hoops for things like signing up for each other’s health insurance.  If you are a same-sex couple who wants to file a joint federal tax return – even in a state where same-sex marriage is not illegal — you’re out of luck. And don’t even think of leaving your Social Security benefits — which you have worked your whole life to accrue — to one another when one of you dies. What we have is anti-gay discrimination. And it is wrong.

EVERYONE should have the right to TIE THE KNOT.

 

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Congratulations, Alan and Dave, on your marriage! I am so happy for you both, and I am completely 100% supportive of you and of your civil rights.

 

 

Waiting for Ross – End Game – Part 1

By an anonymous friend of Metalbond

Part 1

At first it appeared as an inanimate black silhouette, the reflective outline of a lifeless mannequin, folded and chained inside steel bars. As the lighting intensified, however, efforts at movement were obvious. When the compact package struggled to squirm, the exertions showed an unmistakably male form, masculine and athletic, sealed in rubber, and contorted by bondage.

Continue reading Waiting for Ross – End Game – Part 1